From There to Here and Beyond

Earliest versions of the internet have been around for literally centuries. The first commercial electric telegraph was sent in 1837, which can be largely considered to be the starting point in terms of technological advancements of what we know as the internet today. But how on earth did we as a society go from sending telegraphs in morse code which could take hours to translate to communicating through social media in milliseconds?

That’s an answer that can’t be given in 150 words so I’m not going to attempt. Our society today is so heavily reliant on the internet that it could be considered a little bit ridiculous, however it hasn’t always been like this

week 2 meme - internet.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the early days of the internet as we know it today, not everybody had access to it. Although this ‘big and exciting’ advancement was initially made years ago, its value has only really been realised in recent years as everybody in the world gradually gains access. And it’s true, until everyone has access to the internet (even those in third world countries and societies) it will continue to remain somewhat of a curiosity.

Catch ya on the flip side,

Jess x

Starter Packs 101

The Starter Pack meme was one of the biggest memes of 2017 and continues to bring humour to social media in 2018. While it might me ‘just a meme’ the Starter Packs can reveal a lot about a persons online and offline persona. 

There is a Starter Pack meme for literally everything. Types of people at a particular event, people at school/university, people in their everyday lives, you name it, there’s a Starter Pack for it.

After this week discussing online persona and perception, we decided to see how Starter Packs could work in the real world and if they have the same effect.

After finding each other starter packs, I realised a few things:

  1. Just because you think you know someone well doesn’t make it easy when you’re under pressure to remember things about them
  2. Starter Packs CAN be made in the real world as well as online – even if a person’s persona in both realms is slightly different
  3. Kmart really does have everything

Catch ya on the flip side,

Jess x

 

 

 

Meme is the Word

The idea that the internet is a copy machine is perhaps best represented in the world of internet memes. Memes somehow manage to transcend social media barriers, making them a popular form of entertainment across all social media platforms.

Individual memes generally start small and then explode as more and more people take the original and give it their own spin. Many would think that memes are a part of society’s ‘lower’ or pop culture, but literally everyone makes, distributes and appreciates memes.  When thinking of ‘higher powers’ that use memes to communicate with their audience, the first thing that comes to mind is the NSW Police Force. Last year (2017), the Police Force’s Facebook page became renowned for sharing not important information that is vital to the safety of citizens, but memes. police gif.gif

In terms of both a marketing tool and a public relations tool, the Police Force’s use of memes was genius. The relatability and humour of the posts allowed engagement with a whole new audience who are typically stereotyped as ‘not interested’ in such affairs; Millennials.

Sadly, the NSW Police Force memes have since died off, but the success of memes in the ‘fight’ against crime, whether legitimate or not is undoubtable.

Catch ya on the flip side,

Jess x

 

An Analysis of Australian Music Festivals in 2018 (By Someone Who is Completely Unqualified To Do So)

As someone who has never actually been to a music festival (soon to be rectified in July), I like to think I know I fair bit about them. I mean, it doesn’t take a genius to figure out the ‘basics’ of every single Australian music festival on the festival calendar. I’m serious, just go and have a look through the Instagram tags and you’ll learn everything there is to know about them.

Music Festival Starter Pack

But sadly, in recent years, music festivals have become less about the actual music and more about the promotion and marketing opportunities that the festivals create. What you wear has become more important than what band is playing next and the photos you take are more important than the friends you make. You don’t need to go to the festivals anymore because your entire Instagram and Facebook feed will be filled with images from every single moment of the festival within 24 hours. Yet tickets for said festivals are getting harder and harder to come by.

Why?

Because music festivals have become increasingly about perpetuating a persons’ brand across all media platforms. Say a girl wears a skirt from a ’boutique’ brand to a festival. She’ll (no doubt) take photos, post a couple of them to her Instagram, most likely tagging the brand and hashtagging the festival. This then leads down two different paths. The brand may take notice and potentially repost the girls’ photo of her wearing their clothing, which gives the girl positive exposure (and in this social media age, who doesn’t like that?) and the brand also gets exposure to a whole new market (being the girls Instagram following) by being tagged in the original image. Because she also hashtagged the image with the festival, thousands of other people will see the image, increasing both the brand and the girls’ following. Plus, its inevitable that her followers and friends will find themselves suffering from a case of FOMO (fear of missing out). A similar pattern can occur across all media platforms including Facebook and YouTube.

This increase in the need for people to share their lives on social media, specifically when it comes to music festivals, has also led to an increase in transmedia advertising for brands generally linked to music festivals. And this trend shows no sign of slowing, whether this is a good or bad thing, we’ll just have to wait and see.

Catch ya on the flip side,

Jess x