Meme is the Word

The idea that the internet is a copy machine is perhaps best represented in the world of internet memes. Memes somehow manage to transcend social media barriers, making them a popular form of entertainment across all social media platforms.

Individual memes generally start small and then explode as more and more people take the original and give it their own spin. Many would think that memes are a part of society’s ‘lower’ or pop culture, but literally everyone makes, distributes and appreciates memes.  When thinking of ‘higher powers’ that use memes to communicate with their audience, the first thing that comes to mind is the NSW Police Force. Last year (2017), the Police Force’s Facebook page became renowned for sharing not important information that is vital to the safety of citizens, but memes. police gif.gif

In terms of both a marketing tool and a public relations tool, the Police Force’s use of memes was genius. The relatability and humour of the posts allowed engagement with a whole new audience who are typically stereotyped as ‘not interested’ in such affairs; Millennials.

Sadly, the NSW Police Force memes have since died off, but the success of memes in the ‘fight’ against crime, whether legitimate or not is undoubtable.

Catch ya on the flip side,

Jess x

 

Modern Media ‘Moguls’

In today’s society, it’s all about who you know, not what you know. And it is this which gives social media ‘influencers’ their power, whether they deserve it or not. 

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There’s no real requirements to being a ‘social media influencer’ but they all have one thing in common; they love to tell you that they are. But while they can generate a lot of criticism, there’s no use in denying that they have power, even if it is only in the social media world.

One of the major impacts that influencers have had on media is a change in the way that brands use media to advertise their product or service. A post made by an influencer on the platform of their choosing is highly likely to generate a lot more traffic towards a brand than an advertising slot in a legacy media channel. Because of this, brands also have the ability to analyse the success of their advertisements through an influencer in a way that just isn’t possible with legacy media.

Whether this change is for the better or worse isn’t exactly clear, but one thing’s for certain; social media influencers aren’t going anywhere.

Catch ya on the flip side,

Jess x

 

 

 

 

The Medium is the what?

The Medium is the Message. In the words of Marshall McLuhan, a message is “the change of scale or pace or pattern” and the medium is “any extension of ourselves”, but  how do they relate?

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In our ever-changing technological era, the focus is generally placed on the messages we receive from the media as a whole. Every day we take in new information and disperse our own interpretations of it. But the way in which we are presented this information is a lot more important than many would think.

Take Twitter for example. The online platform has over 330 million monthly users, approximately 1.8 billion less than Facebook. But why does Twitter have so many less? Twitter’s format attracts a different, smaller demographic than Facebook, primarily because of its short, straight-to-the-point way of communicating.

But what does this have to do with ‘the Medium is the Message’? The medium of Twitter dictates the way messages are portrayed on the platform. Everything from the character limit to the ability to add gifs to a ‘tweet’ appeals to a specific market, whom best use this particular medium to their advantage.  If it was freeform, allowing longer posts like Facebook, well, it wouldn’t be Twitter anymore would it? It would simply become lost amongst the thousands of other communication platforms across the internet.

To me, the medium in which we communicate our individual messages really is an extension of ourselves, even if sometimes we wish it wasn’t.

Catch ya on the flip side,

Jess x

What the hell is a Digital Artefact?

Whenever I’m talking to someone about uni and I’ve said that I have to do a ‘Digital Artefact’, I’m usually met with blank stares. I then usually go onto explain that it’s ultimately a collection of media based around a topic, produced on the internet for public access. Seems easy enough right?

Wrong.

I mean, once you actually have an idea, a means to go about said idea and a projected audience, it really does seem somewhat achievable. However, the process to actually get to this point is exhaustive, and one which I’m still chipping away at.

I’d like to think I had a breakthrough this afternoon. After using Travis Wall’s ‘Project Starter’ I realised that yes, there was something that I know more about than the average person. Musicals. Because of this discovery, I’m ‘tossing around’ ideas of content that I could create to educate, entertain and enthuse musical lovers like myself. The front runner at this stage is a series of short video summaries of popular musicals, done in a comical style. Now we’ll just have to wait and see if I’ll actually be able to get this idea off the ground…

Catch ya on the flip side,

Jess x